Sunday, December 7, 2014

Historical recipe from: Miss E. Briggs, Instruction in Cookery, 1890


From a schoolbook teaching cooking to girls in London, published in 1890, comes this recipe for Christmas Pudding. The recipe appeared near the end of the book, implying that it was a more difficult recipe than the ones earlier in the book. I have reformatted the recipe for easier reading, but the text is exactly as it was in the original.

Keep in mind that this is recipe from history. Standards of ingredients and methods of preparation have changed, and we have different ideas today of what is healthy.

1 lb. raisins (stoned)Historical recipe from: Miss E. Briggs, Instruction in Cookery, 1890.

Ingredients:
1 lb. currants (washed and picked)
1 lb. sugar
1/2 lb. sultanas (washed and picked)
1/2 lb mixed peel (shredded)
1/4 lb. almonds, if liked (blanched and shredded)
3/4 lb. flour
1/4 lb. breadcrumbs
3/4 lb. beef suet (chopped finely)
6 eggs
milk (according to size of eggs)
rind of 1 lemon (grated)
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful, or to taste, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon.

Method:
Mix the whole of the ingredients very thoroughly – much depends on this; beat the eggs and milk, add them and stir it very well again. Put it into well-greased moulds or basins, cover with greased paper, tie the cloths over them, and boil from 6 to 10 hours, according to size. When the puddings are turned out the appearance is improved by dredging them with castor sugar. If they are not wanted at once, keep them in a cool, dry place.
* Historical recipe from: Miss E. Briggs, Instruction in Cookery, 1890.

Photo: From a schoolbook teaching cooking to girls in London, published in 1890, comes this recipe for Christmas Pudding. The recipe appeared near the end of the book, implying that it was a more difficult recipe than the ones earlier in the book. I have reformatted the recipe for easier reading, but the text is exactly as it was in the original. 

Keep in mind that this is recipe from history. Standards of ingredients and methods of preparation have changed, and we have different ideas today of what is healthy.

1 lb. raisins (stoned)Historical recipe from: Miss E. Briggs, Instruction in Cookery, 1890.

Ingredients:
1 lb. currants (washed and picked)
1 lb. sugar
1/2 lb. sultanas (washed and picked)
1/2 lb mixed peel (shredded)
1/4 lb. almonds, if liked (blanched and shredded)
3/4 lb. flour
1/4 lb. breadcrumbs
3/4 lb. beef suet (chopped finely)
6 eggs
milk (according to size of eggs)
rind of 1 lemon (grated)
1/2 teaspoonful of salt
1 teaspoonful, or to taste, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon.

Method:
Mix the whole of the ingredients very thoroughly – much depends on this; beat the eggs and milk, add them and stir it very well again. Put it into well-greased moulds or basins, cover with greased paper, tie the cloths over them, and boil from 6 to 10 hours, according to size. When the puddings are turned out the appearance is improved by dredging them with castor sugar. If they are not wanted at once, keep them in a cool, dry place.
* Historical recipe from: Miss E. Briggs, Instruction in Cookery, 1890.


Friday, October 3, 2014

The Text of Lincoln's 1863 Thanksgiving Proclamation




Thanksgiving did not become a national holiday in the United States until the fall of 1863, when President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring that the last Thursday in November would be a day of national thanksgiving. While Lincoln issued the proclamation, credit for making Thanksgiving a national holiday should go to Sarah J. Hale, the editor of Godey's Lady's Book, a popular magazine for women in 19th century America.
Hale, who campaigned for years to make Thanksgiving a nationally observed holiday, wrote to Lincoln on September 28, 1863 and urged him to issue a proclamation. Hale mentioned in her letter that having such a national day of Thanksgiving would establish a "great Union Festival of America."
The idea seemed to catch on, and the northern states celebrated Thanksgiving on the date noted in Lincoln's proclamation, the last Thursday in November, which fell on November 26, 1863.With the United States in the depths of the Civil War, perhaps Lincoln was attracted to the idea of a holiday unifying the nation. At that time Lincoln was also contemplating delivering an address on the purpose of the war which would become the Gettysburg Address.
Lincoln wrote a proclamation, which was issued on October 3, 1863. The New York Times published a copy of the proclamation two days later.
The text of Lincoln's 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation follows:
October 3, 1863
By the President of the United States
A Proclamation
The year that is drawing toward its close has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever-watchful providence of Almighty God.
In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign states to invite and provoke their aggressions, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere, except in the theater of military conflict; while that theater has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union.
Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defense have not arrested the plow, the shuttle, or the ship; the ax has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege, and the battlefield, and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom.
No human counsel hath devised, nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy.
It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently, and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American people. I do, therefore, invite my fellow-citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next as a Day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the heavens. And I recommend to them that, while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners, or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty hand to heal the wounds of the nation, and to restore it, as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes, to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility, and union.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United Stated States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington, this third day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-eighth.
Abraham Lincoln

Thursday, September 18, 2014

The US Capitol

http://architecture.about.com/od/usa/ig/Washington-DC/US-Capitol-Building.htm?utm_medium=email&utm_source=sharea&utm_campaign=shareables&utm_content=20140918

For almost two centuries, America's governing bodies, the Senate and the House of Representatives, have gathered under the dome of the US Capitol.
The U.S. Capitol Building
Built:
 1793-1829 and 1851-1863
Style: Neoclassical
Architects:
• William Thornton
• Benjamin Henry Latrobe
• Charles Bulfinch
Dome: Thomas Ustick Walter

Friday, September 5, 2014

Martha Washington Candy

Martha Washington Candy 
by Diana Rattray
about.com

2 pounds sifted confectioners' sugar
1 can sweetened condensed milk
2 cups flaked coconut
1 stick butter or margarine, melted (4 ounces)
3 cups chopped pecans
Dipping Chocolate (below), melted

* Preparation:
Mix all ingredients together, shape into balls, then chill until hard. Dip chilled balls in dipping chocolate and let cool.
Store in airtight container in refrigerator.

* Dipping Chocolate:
Use melted chocolate almond bark or purchased dipping chocolate, or the mixture below:

1 cake paraffin wax
12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips
Melt wax and milk chocolate chips together in double boiler. Dip candy in mixture then cool

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

http://history1800s.about.com/od/abrahamlincoln/ig/Lincoln-Portraits/

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Abraham Lincoln's Favorite French Almond Cake


Abraham Lincoln's Favorite French Almond Cake


Abraham Lincoln's Favorite French Almond Cake

Ever wondered what Honest Abe loved to eat? A fantastic new book, Abraham Lincoln in the Kitchen by Rae Katherine Eighmey, sheds light on our 16th president’s culinary habits from his childhood through his time in office

Ingredients:

4 large eggs, separated
1⁄2 cup granulated sugar, pulverized
3⁄4 tsp pure almond extract
1⁄4 tsp pure lemon extract
3 oz blanched slivered almonds, finely crushed or chopped into 1⁄16-inch pieces
1⁄4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour, sifted 3 times

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

2. In a deep, large (3-quart) bowl beat egg whites until they stand in stiff peaks, then set aside.

3. In a second large bowl, using an electric mixer, beat egg yolks until they are thick and have turned into a light yellow color. This could take as long as 5 minutes.

4. With the mixer running, begin adding the sugar about a tablespoon at a time. Continue beating until the sugar is fully incorporated and the batter is thick.

5. Stir in the almond and lemon extracts and then the almonds.

6. Stir in the flour.

7. With a flexible rubber spatula, fold about one-third of the beaten egg whites into the egg yolk batter to lighten it up. Then gently fold this lightened batter into the remaining egg whites.

8. Pour the batter into an ungreased tube pan.

9. Bake until the cake is firm and lightly browned on top, about 25 to 30 minutes.

10. Invert the pan over a bottle to cool completely before removing the cake from the pan.

Monday, February 17, 2014

Presidents Day



Presidents Day!




Happy Presidents Day! We hope you are all enjoying a day off from work and school. But do you knowwhy Americans celebrate this holiday in the first place? While it's intended to recognize all of the Presidents of the United States (Oh hey, Obama!), it specifically honors Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, since their birthdays fall around this time of year. Let's learn more about #16, #1, and all of the important POTUSes of the past — and how to make the most of our three-day weekend.

Top 10 US Presidents 
Many people have a favorite (and not so favorite) President. Don't miss our American History Expert's picks for 10 most influential US Presidents. Do you agree with the rankings — and did your favorite make the list?

All About Abe 
Last Wednesday, February 12, we celebrated Abraham Lincoln's 205th birthday. Honest Abe was known for leading the country through the Civil War, taking huge steps toward ending slavery, and writing some of the most memorable speeches in American history.

George Washington: Father of His Country 
This Saturday, February 22, will mark George Washington's 282nd birthday. (Phew, that's a lot of candles!) We know he was the very first President, a Founding Father of the nation, and that he mighthave had wooden teeth. But you probably don't know these 10 interesting facts about the man who set the Presidential precedent.

Celebrate Presidents Day With a Cherry on Top 
Most of us enjoy the long holiday weekend vegging on the couch or with a shopping spree at the mall. But did you know early Americans traditionally celebrated Washington's birthday with tasty cherry treats? It makes sense when you remember the popular myth about good ol' George chopping down a cherry tree as a young boy. Now what should we make first?

Thursday, January 16, 2014

The Hidden Faith of The Founding Fathers

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Young Mr. Lincoln (1939)

Abraham Lincoln Biography | History Channel Documentary

Presidents Day: Mr Lincoln

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